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Paris

Paris is the home of the most visited art museum in the world, the Louvre, as well as the Musee d'Orsay, noted for its collection of French Impressionist art, and the Musee National d'Art Moderne, a museum of modern and contemporary art.

The notable architectural landmarks of Paris include Notre Dame Cathedral (12th century); the Sainte-Chapelle (13th century); the Eiffel Tower (1889); and the Basilica of Sacre-Coeur on Montmartre (1914). In 2014 Paris received 22.4 million visitors, making it one of the world's top tourist destinations. Paris is also known for its fashion, particularly the twice-yearly Paris Fashion Week, and for its haute cuisine, and three-star restaurants. Most of France's major universities and grandes ecoles are located in Paris, as are France's major newspapers, including Le Monde, Le Figaro, and Liberation.

Paris is home to the association football club Paris Saint-Germain and the rugby union club Stade Francais. The 80,000-seat Stade de France, built for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, is located in Saint-Denis. Paris hosts the annual French Open Grand Slam tennis tournament on the red clay of Roland Garros. Paris played host to the 1900 and 1924 Summer Olympics, the 1938 and 1998 FIFA World Cups, and the 2007 Rugby World Cup.

The largest opera houses of Paris are the 19th-century Opera Garnier (historical Paris Opera) and modern Opera Bastille; the former tends toward the more classic ballets and operas, and the latter provides a mixed repertoire of classic and modern.

Fashion
Paris has been an international capital of high fashion since the 19th century, particularly in the domain of haute couture, clothing hand-made to order for private clients. It is home of some of the largest fashion houses in the world, including Dior and Chanel, and of many well-known fashion designers, including Karl Lagerfeld, Jean-Paul Gaultier, Christophe Josse and Christian Lacroix.

Infrastructure
Paris in its early history had only the Seine and Bievre rivers for water. From 1809, the Canal de l'Ourcq provided Paris with water from less-polluted rivers to the north-east of the capital. Paris today has more than 421 municipal parks and gardens, covering more than 3,000 hectares and containing more than 250,000 trees.Two of Paris' oldest and most famous gardens are the Tuileries Garden, created in 1564 for the Tuileries Palace, and redone by Andre Le Notre between 1664 and 1672. In Paris' Roman era, its main cemetery was located to the outskirts of the Left Bank settlement, but this changed with the rise of Catholicism, where most every inner-city church had adjoining burial grounds for use by their parishes.